Cathedral High School baserunner Alex Weadock sprints toward first base after collecting a hit during a recent game against Natchez High School. Weadock, a sophomore, currently has a 4.12 grade-point average. (Jay Sowers \ The Natchez Democrat)
Cathedral High School baserunner Alex Weadock sprints toward first base after collecting a hit during a recent game against Natchez High School. Weadock, a sophomore, currently has a 4.12 grade-point average. (Jay Sowers \ The Natchez Democrat)

Scholar athlete: Weadock avoids procrastination to stay on top of his grades

Published 12:01am Thursday, March 7, 2013

NATCHEZ — When the schoolwork piles up, Alex Weadock uses athletics as an escape.

That seems to be working well for him, as the Cathedral High School sophomore has a 4.12 grade-point average. Whether he’s on the football field, basketball court or baseball diamond, Weadock said sports have never overwhelmed him to the point where his grades suffered.

“They always say being active helps with your overall health, and playing sports helps take my mind off (all the schoolwork) and relaxes me so I’m not stressed out,” Weadock said. “Being active kind of helps, because you’re always doing something. Paying attention in school helps a lot, too.”

Weadock has seen playing time in the outfield and as a relief pitcher for the baseball team so far this season, and Green Wave head coach Craig Beesley said from watching him, he can understand why Weadock does well in school.

“He grasps things really quickly,” Beesley said. “He’s always going to be focused on the task at hand, whether it’s sports or academics. He picks up on things, whether you’re teaching him or he’s watching other kids.”

The biggest key to making good grades while balancing sports is making sure not to procrastinate, Weadock said.

“I have an essay due Friday, but I worked on it (Wednesday), because I know I have a game (today),” Weadock said. “Sometimes you have to stay up late, or do your homework before school if you’re at a game late.”

It may be simple advice, but the temptation to procrastinate seems to be easy to give into. Weadock said he understands why.

“You don’t have the willpower,” Weadock said. “When you get home from practice, you don’t have the energy to do your schoolwork. You would rather do something else.”

To combat the mental and even physical fatigue, Weadock said keeping himself stress-free is a useful weapon.

“You don’t want to freak out,” Weadock said. “You have to keep yourself calm and do the work. Sometimes you have to make yourself do it, but after awhile, it becomes a rhythm, so you’re used to it.”

Because he’s involved in three sports, plus summer weightlifting and reading, there’s never really any down time for Weadock. He said he enjoys staying busy.

“Sometimes I wish I had free time, but I like playing sports,” Weadock said. “I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t play sports.”

As a sophomore, Weadock is part of a young core that Beesley is relying on to step up throughout the course of the season. Weadock said he’s been impressed with the freshmen class so far.

“(Beesley’s) son, Andrew, is starting for us at second,” Weadock said. “We have two other ninth-graders starting. The freshmen class as a whole is good at baseball, so we have a bright future.”

A bright future that Weadock should be a key part of, Beesley said.

“He’s a great kid,” Beesley said. “He doesn’t say much — he’s more of a lead-by-example kind of person, but he does anything you ask. You can tell him one time, and he’ll pick it up quickly.”

Weadock is the son of Rosemary and Ashley Weadock.