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Mickey Walker

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Services for Mickey Laukhuff Walker, 88, of Destin, Fla., who died Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011, at Natchez Regional Medical Center, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Christ the King Luthern Church with the Rev. Mark Goble officiating.

Burial will follow at Elmwood Cemetery under the direction of Memorial Park Funeral Home.

Visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home and from 10 a.m. until service time Monday at the church.

Mrs. Walker was born on March 2, 1922, in Potts Camp, the daughter of Bufford Ethurl Nolen and Thelma Gladys Tucker Nolen.

Mickey Laukhuff is probably most well known for her work with stained glass. During World War II, Mickey ground prisms for bombsights and in doing so she found her “true love” was working with glass. After the war, she worked for Binswanger Glass Company’s Stained Glass Studio in Memphis and in 1961, fulfilled her dream of having her own company when she started Laukhuff Stained Glass. She developed a talent for blending the texture and colors of glass and lead into a unique business. She created beautiful pieces of art for churches, homes, offices, restaurants and hotels all over the world. Some of her patrons included St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Rhodes College, and Elvis Presley, who had pieces commissioned for his beloved Graceland. Creating unique pieces of art for churches and other places of worship provided Mickey with an opportunity to work with clergy and laypeople of all religions and faiths while creating a legacy of beautiful pieces of art for years to come.

A founding member of the Society of Entrepreneurs, Ms. Laukhuff-Walker was the first woman to own a stained glass company in the United States. For Mickey, entrepreneurship was all about passing on the spirit — giving young people and others an incentive to reach their potential through their dreams, ideas, talents, hard work and ambitions … making this a better world to live in. She gave of her time and talents to many organizations throughout Memphis, including the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, the Memphis Symphony League, the Child Advocacy Center, the Pink Palace Museum and the Memphis Arts Council, just to name a few.

For her business and philanthropic efforts she was recognized in May 1973, by The World Who’s Who of Women for her Distinguished Achievements. Also known around Memphis as the lady in pink, a color she loved so much that she drove a pink Lincoln and sported pink golf clubs.

She sold her business in 1986 and later retired to Destin where she continued her charitable work throughout the community donating her works of art to the Sacred Heart Hospital Chapel and the Community Church of Destin.

She will be laid to rest next to her first husband. She will rest below a unique marble monument in the form of a church with stained glass windows that she designed and had built. Since its erection, the monument has become a recognized feature of Elmwood. The monument celebrates the spirit of her life and work with an inscription that reads, “All things are possible with the help of God.”

Mrs. Walker was preceded in death by her parents; four sisters, Ilene Grohman and husband, Joe, Marvis Crumpton and husband, Rubert, Alice O’Bannon and Ethleen Schmittou and husband, Joseph; husbands, Ralph L. Laukhuff Sr. and William H. Walker; and daughter-in-law, Karla Marie Laukhuff.

Survivors include one son, Ralph L. Laukhuff Jr. of Vidalia; three grandchildren, Ralph Lewis “Randy” Laukhuff III and wife, Bethaney, of Lafayette, La., Kari Marie Blaney and husband, Charles “Kippy” of Ferriday and Brittny Marie Laukhuff of Boston, Mass; seven great-grandchildren, Chad Laukhuff, Christian Leggett, Charles Leggett and Gary Leggett, all of Lafayette, Chase Laukhuff of Starkville, Emily Farmer and husband, Cade, Chad Blaney and wife, Angele, all of Natchez and Wesley Blaney and wife, Robyn, of Vidalia; and two great-great-grandchildren, Silas Blaney of Natchez and Selah Blaney of Vidalia.

Pallbearers will be Chase Laukhuff, Chad Laukhuff, Christian Leggett, Charles Leggett, Gary Leggett and Ronald Mc Coach.

Online condolences may be sent to Memorial Park Funeral Home at www.memorialparkonline.com.

In lieu of flowers, if desired, contributions may be made to the Brooks Art Gallery, St. Jude Hospital or a charity of choice.

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