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Ferriday Lower students share stories of history

FERRIDAY —Ferriday Lower Elementary School second graders celebrated Black History Month Friday morning by putting on a program honoring the special month.

The school put on a program commemorating important figures and events that contributed to black history.

Second grader Brondric Hawkins opened the program with a prayer of remembrance.

“We will never forget those who did what they could to help,” he said.

Students Zakasha Humphries and Britney Webber then recited poetry by famous black poet Langston Hughes.

Webber had the audience of parents, students and teachers roaring with applause after her performance of “Mother to Son.”

Student Samuel Collier then spoke to the crowd about the importance of Black History Month.

“We gather here so we can reflect on African Americans and all of their great accomplishments,” he said. “We are grateful for those who died so we can all have the same conveniences we do today.”

The students then honored eight famous African Americans such as James Booker, Colin Powell, Condolezza Rice and Martin Luther King Jr., giving a brief history of each.

A group of six students then performed the skit, “This Seat Is Taken,” a brief retelling of the famous incident with Rosa Parks.

Dressed in glasses, a hat and a wrap, student Yahriel Lee portrayed a very emotional Parks after she was asked to stand up and give away her seat on the bus.

“I am tired of getting pushed around,” Yahriel yelled to student Brandon Smith who was playing the bus driver.

Students in the choir then sang “Kumbayah” and “Wade in the Water” before they joined hands to sing their final number “We Shall Overcome.”

FLE Principal Sheila Alwood said the students performance at the program was something their parents should cherish.

“This is the best Black History Month program we have ever had,” she said. “Everyone looked and acted so professionally up there.”

Assistant principal Bobbie Hinson thanked the students for the efforts they put into the play.

“There was a lot of hard work that went into this program,” she said.

Hinson said the Black History Month program has always been one of her favorites because of the message behind it.

“Our children need to know the history, and we need to teach them about it,” she said. “It is our responsibility to keep the children abreast about the people who provided all of these great opportunities for African Americans.”

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